Category Archives: Eric Flint

Book Review: 1636: The Devil’s Opera by Eric Flint and David Carrico

Baen
510 pp.

1636: The Devil’s Opera involves the use of music as propaganda. (This is actually more interesting than the first line would indicate.) With Emperor Gustavus Adolphus non compos mentis and with Chancellor Oxenstierna attempting to take over the government, it suddenly becomes very important to make sure Magdeburg, the capitol city of the USE remains prominent in the minds of the populace. It’s decided that the best way to do this is with an opera showing support for the emperor. Various people are assembled to make this happen, including Marla Linder and her company of downtime musical partners. (Marla also decides to sing a song from Les Miserables which has some dangerous political sentiments guaranteed to ruffle the feathers of the nobility.) Continue reading

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Filed under alternate history, anomaly/nexus, David Carrico, Eric Flint, Review: Book, science fiction

Book Review: 1636: The Kremlin Games by Eric Flint, Gorg Huff & Paula Goodlett

BAEN
408 pp.

The events of The Kremlin Games actually stretches between 1631 (the arrival of Grantville in Germany) and 1636. Our main protagonist is Bernie Zeppi, a former auto mechanic who is not quite sure what to do with himself in the strange new world that is the 17th Century. He gets hired as a technology consultant by a Russian noble who has been sent by the czar to investigate Grantville. Russia of the 17th Century is about two centuries behind the rest of Europe, and Bernie is kind of the bargain basement version of a consultant but is the best Russian rubles can buy. Continue reading

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Filed under alternate history, anomaly/nexus, Eric Flint, Gorg Huff, Paula Goodlett, Review: Book, science fiction

Book Review: Burdens of the Dead by Mercedes Lackey, David Freer and Eric Flint

BAEN
438 pp.

The Children of Alexandria series has the following premise: Due to the libarian/philosopher/teacher Hypatia mysteriously converting to Christianity after a debate with a mysterious figure, she is able to save the Library of Alexandria and avoid being torn apart by Christian monks. With this significant change in history, magic and magical creatures exist and continue to share a somewhat uneasy existence with the mortal world. (Magic users are accepted by the Hypatian Order, and this version of Christianity is slightly less horrible to non-Christians during this time period. Jews and other non-Christians are still confined in ghettoes but you get the feeling there are fewer pogroms.) Continue reading

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Filed under alternate history, David Freer, Eric Flint, fantasy, Mercedes Lackey

Book Review: Portal by Ryk E. Spoor and Eric Flint

BAEN
309 pp.

In Portal, our heroes are stranded on Europa after the events of Threshold. While they and the survivors from the Odin attempt to jury-rig a way to get home, they discover that General Hohenheim is still alive and work out a way to rescue him. (They are also making an effort to keep what happened more or less secret. There is a very real concern about further attempts at sabotage or murder from the enemies who instigated the events of the previous book.) Meanwhile, back on Earth, there is a growing suspicion that the accident wasn’t one. Continue reading

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Filed under Eric Flint, Review: Book, Ryk E. Spoor, science fiction, space exploration

Book Review: 1635: The Papal Stakes by Eric Flint and Charles E. Gannon

Baen

654 pp.

The Papal Stakes is mostly about various attempts to rescue Frank Stone and his wife. It is also about pope Urban trying to decide whether he wants to accept the help of the USE. In addition, we have a great deal of debate on whether or not Grantville is part of some vast plot conceived by Satan. (The debate is not very interesting or exciting however.) Continue reading

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Filed under anomaly/nexus, Eric Flint, Review: Book, science fiction

Book Review: Forward the Mage, by Eric Flint and Richard Roach

Baen
464 pp.

Forward the Mage is neither a prequel nor sequel to The Philosophical Strangler. Instead, this book is chronologically somewhere in the middle of the events of The Philosophical Strangler. Our main protagonists are the wizard Zulkeh, his long suffering apprentice Shelyid, and the artist and swordsman Benvenuti Sfondrati-Piccolomini. We also have revolutionaries, madmen who run their own asylum and a region of absolute anarchy that has regularly scheduled civil wars. Continue reading

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Filed under Eric Flint, fantasy, humor, non-earth, Review: Book

Book Review: The Philosophical Strangler, by Eric Flint

Baen
342 pp.

I first read The Philosophical Strangler when it was being posted in sections on Baen’s Bar. It is a humorous fantasy about politics, weaponised philosophy and revolution. Our Protagonists are a professional strangler named Greyboar and his hapless agent Ignace. Though very successful in his profession, Greyboar is feeling a great deal of ennui about his lifestyle. Motivated by the disapproval of his political activist sister, he attempts to find a philosophy worth following. (Ignace is not happy about this, and complains about it frequently.) Continue reading

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Filed under Eric Flint, fantasy, humor, non-earth, Review: Book