Category Archives: fiction

GBE2 Blog On Prompt 89: Meditation

309895_10151469419389453_1093514455_nIt’s a cold gray day and she finds him down by the water with a fishing pole and a six pack as an excuse. It is debatable whether he wants company or not and she is not inclined to interrupt with conversation for no reason. He in turn is not inclined to object to her presence and the only indication that he appreciates it is a glance and the slightest of smiles.

For her, meditation required a place to sit or occasionally walk. It involves counting breaths and not thinking of any particular thing. For him, meditation was a highly suspect occupation of time that needed to be disguised by some other plausible activity. Heaven forbid anyone see him engaging in something suspect or “new-agey.”  

(She very politely never calls him on this. She is not even going to mention that the six-pack hasn’t even been touched. Nor will she indicate his luck with fishing usually isn’t this bad; he’s been out here for an hour and still hasn’t caught anything. The subterfuge is endearing to her and she doesn’t want him to feel self-conscious.)    

She sits nearby but not too close and watches the wind, the clouds, the light, the water. She does not watch him, but his presence is felt and is comfortable to her. She counts her breaths and doesn’t think about any particular thing.  

So. They are both meditating.

Eventually he does catch fish. She goes back to the house for the portable grill and they have dinner by the water.

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Doing the NaNoWriMo

I decided that I was going to try to do the NaNoWriMo this year. (Unofficially. I didn’t sign up this year.) I have not yet started because of a backlog of other writing I have not been doing. (I wish I could say because of my ongoing job hunt but it is mostly because I keep getting distracted because of stress/depression.) Continue reading

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GBE2 Blog On Prompt 72: Houseguests

This is for GBE2 Prompt 72 Exploring POV

 First Person

 For the first few days, I didn’t know what to do with myself. It didn’t seem quite decent for a young woman living alone to be taking in two houseguests, but the hiri seemed to do things differently. All we could get through the language barrier was that the magus couldn’t stay at the farm, and neither could Narani. After a few days of recuperating at the farm, Magus Karles and me got bundled into a cart and taken to Narani’s home.

The house was a nice little cottage surrounded by maybe three acres of land, a garden, and a couple sheds. Everything was neatly fenced in with low stone walls. Past the fields was an arm of the forest that had killed most of the expedition before the hiri found us. (I am not ashamed to say having the damned forest that close was damned unsettling.) Inside the house was a loft, a storage room just under the loft, a cellar, a kitchen and a sort of open sitting room. There was also a root cellar with a kind of still room set up in the back corner. The floor was wood and decorated with a few rugs. She put the magus up in the loft, me in the store room, and she slept in one of the chairs by the fire.

Like I said, for the first few days, I didn’t know what to do with myself. Supposedly, I was supposed to help tend to the magus, but Miss Narani had her own ideas and her own way of doing things, so my actual job was mostly staying the hell out of her way while she did her chores or saw to the magus. I’m also pretty certain that any good opinion she had of me flew south for the winter after I screamed like a girl the first morning when I woke up face to fanged muzzle with one of her “dogs.” (The animal in question looks more like a nightmare cross between a bird and lizard, but it is more like a dog as far as how they’re used by the hiri.)

Third Person

For the first few days, Asa wasn’t quite sure of what to do with himself.  It didn’t seem quite decent for a young woman living alone to be taking in two houseguests, but the hiri seemed to do things differently. All that could be understood due to the language barrier was that Magus Karles couldn’t stay at the farm, and neither could Narani. After a few days of recuperating at the farm, Magus Karles and Asa were bundled into a cart and taken to Narani’s home.

The house was a nice little cottage surrounded by maybe three acres of land, a garden, and a couple sheds. Everything was neatly fenced in with low stone walls. Past the fields was an arm of the forest that had killed most of the expedition before the hiri had found them. (Asa was not ashamed of being unsettled by the damned forest being so close to the house.) Inside the house was a loft, a storage room just under the loft, a cellar, a kitchen and a sort of open sitting room. There was also a root cellar with a kind of still room set up in the back corner. The floor was wood and decorated with a few rugs. She put the magus up in the loft, Asa in the store room, and she slept in one of the chairs by the fire.

Supposedly, Asa’s reason for accompanying the magus was to help tend to him. However, Miss Narani had her own ideas and her own way of doing things, so Asa’s actual job was mostly involved staying the hell out of her way while she did her chores or saw to the magus. Asa was pretty certain that any good opinion Narani might have had of him south for the winter after he screamed like a girl the first morning when he woke up face to fanged muzzle with one of her “dogs.” (The animal in question looked more like a nightmare cross between a bird and lizard, but was more like a dog as far as how the were used by the hiri.)

 

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Book Review: The Care and Handling of Roses with Thorns by Margaret Dilloway

Putnam
354 pp.

The Care and Handling of Roses with Thorns is Dilloway’s second novel and shares some of the same themes as her previous novel, How to be an American Housewife. The book is about the complicated interactions of friends and families, and one of the major issues is estrangement caused by a difficult family situation. It also has the same gimmick of opening the chapter with a quote from a book. (In How to be an American Housewife the book was a  fictional guide book for Japanese brides, in this book, it is a guide book for growing roses. ) Continue reading

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GBE2 Blog On Prompt 71: Lunch Date

Have some fifteen minute fiction.

“So basically I find out that she does not actually remember the part where she was a horrible bully,” Carly said.

“Somehow I am not surprised at all, considering that is what I told you would happen,” Angie said, not looking up from the yarn she was savagely crocheting into submission. “People generally do not like remembering they were assholes, because everyone is the hero of their own story blah, blah, blah. So, other than discovering the Convenient Amnesia Effect, how did the lunch go?”

“Okay, I guess. She mostly talked about her family,” Carly said. “She has a little girl and an older boy, her husband is a lawyer, she’s a school counselor…”

“That sounds scary considering what you’ve told me,” Angie said.

“Yeah,” Carly said. “But I was good and did not do anything creepy like interrogate her, or rant at her.” Carly glanced sidelong at her friend. “Should I have?”

“I don’t know. Probably not, I mean, you can’t tell from one conversation whether someone’s turned over a new leaf or not, right. And even if she doesn’t remember the crap she pulled on you, that’s no reason to think she’d be a bad counselor.”

“Or a good one,” Carly said.

“Exactly.”

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Aftermath of a Dissertation

Prompt: Two People Come Out of a Building and Into a Story

“Are you sure you’re all right?” I didn’t want to hover (even if I was, essentially hovering) but Drew was a mess. No broken bones, but he was limping carefully down the shallow steps, and his face was one big bruise. He had done really well during the presentation and follow up questions. It had been a very tight, well researched paper, and he hadn’t flinched once during the debate or challenge phases. I thought his footwork had been a little ungraceful and some of his arguments a little too glib, but overall, it had been a great dissertation. Continue reading

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Prompt: Career Day “Leaf from a Book”

This is for a prompt community on Facebook. I was not really able to follow the prompt.

CAREER DAY. You’ve agreed to give a talk at your child’s school for Career Day. Not only do you hate public speaking, you found out yesterday that you’ve been fired from your job – and you haven’t told your kid yet. Write what happens when you go to the school to present. (500 words or less). Continue reading

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